The Simpsons: Hit & Run designer on how to help make a remake happen

the simpsons hit and run interview christopher mitchell

Even seventeen years on, Christopher Mitchell and his former colleagues from Radical Entertainment are somewhat astounded by the breakthrough success of The Simpsons: Hit & Run.

Following the launch of The Simpsons: Road Rage, the team looked to produce something bigger and better with Hit & Run, but even with their greater ambitions, the team could not have predicted the overwhelming success the follow-up would be.

the simpsons hit and run interview christopher mitchell game logo

Even seventeen years on, Christopher Mitchell and his former colleagues from Radical Entertainment are somewhat astounded by the breakthrough success of The Simpsons: Hit & Run.

Following the launch of The Simpsons: Road Rage, the team looked to produce something bigger and better with Hit & Run, but even with their greater ambitions, the team could not have predicted the overwhelming success the follow-up would be.

“I see it popping up on Reddit all the time,” says Mitchell, one of the game designers on The Simpsons: Hit & Run. “People saying ‘where is the remaster?!’ My only concern with a remaster is that it was a lot of people’s favourite kids’ game, and I worry a little about rose-tinted glasses and whatnot. I love the game a lot and I would love to see it get re-released. And of course, I would buy it and play it like everybody else.”

One of the reasons The Simpsons: Hit & Run was such a hit with audiences was the way it so perfectly captured the humour of the show, incorporating famous lines that are still quoted to this day, and a madcap caper of a storyline that was quintessential Simpsons fare. Radical was made up of hardcore Simpsons fans and it shows in every facet of the game, from its writing down to the locations and landmarks you would spot around Springfield. For a Simpsons-nut like Mitchell, writing the game was like a dream come true.

“I wrote the mission dialogue and non-interactive bits and a lot of the sound events that fired off in the game. These sections would then get sent to The Simpsons writers that had to approve what I had written,” he explains. “They were very nice about it too, giving feedback that they liked the quality of the writing in the game. I was a monster Simpsons fan back then, I could quote you whole episodes, so a lot of the time I was just writing down what I thought Homer would say.”

What’s more, Mitchell remains positive that there is hope for The Simpsons: Hit & Run to return. When quizzed about the various petitions calling for a remake or a sequel, he offers encouragement to the dedicated fans.

“Obviously, I hope they succeed! Ultimately that is the best way to make something like that happen is just show that simple groundswell of support of people who are basically doing shadow testing. They’re basically announcing that ‘yes, we will buy the game’ and that’ll populate the spreadsheet to make those decisions.”

The team at Radical were actually in the early stages of developing a follow-up to Hit & Run before the project was ultimately cancelled. Wrapping up, Mitchell shares some tantalising titbits about features that could have made it into Hit & Run 2.

“I saw a really cool motorcycle prototype and there was some interesting talk about a trailer-hitch style thing. Imagine those cool 90-degree turns you can do and then swinging the trailer around like it was a mace or something!”

Although no solid news of a remaster or sequel has surfaced yet – even though the game is crying out for a remake – it seems there is still hope for the game to return in some form, as long as the demand remains.

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